RNG Project Response: pollution issues

It is not true that toxins are released into the water system by our treatment plant. Emissions from the plant are cleaner than water from upstream.

  • Councillor Burbach: The city follows provincial regulations to assure that emissions are clean.
  • Councillor Vassilakos: See the report of the Infrastructure, Transportation and Safety sub-committee, reproduced below. (This is page 44 of the pdf file found here.)
  • Councillor Henderson:  I can tell you I questioned when there is a water run off the water still goes through a process and when it enters the river its cleaner then the river that its emptying into to. The water reports are on the city website and there are very strict guidelines. I did follow up about the quote that there was dead plant life etc and there isn’t anything like this happening here in the city. Believe me many people walk the trails and they would of reported this.

Infrastructure, Transportation and Safety Sub-committee Agenda – May 29, 2019. MANAGEMENT REPORT

May 29, 2019
Infrastructure, Transportation and Safety Sub-committee
Mike Mortimer, Manager of Environmental Services
ITS19-028
OCWA’s 2018 Annual Performance Report to City of Stratford Mar2019

Title: 2018 Stratford Water Pollution Control Plant Annual Report
Objective: To submit the 2018 Stratford Water Pollution Control Plant Annual Report to

Sub-Committee and Council for their information.

Background: The Stratford Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) is owned by the City of Stratford, but operated under contract by Ontario Clean Water Agency (OCWA). OCWA has prepared the 2018 Annual WPCP Report, which must be submitted annually to the Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks (MECP), showing how the treatment plant performed throughout the year.

The report summarizes the operation for the WPCP and reports on all the activities that occurred at the treatment plant throughout the year. The report also indicates how the plant met all of the Environmental Compliance Approval requirements for effluent discharge into the Avon River.

Analysis:

Total Flows – The treatment plant treated a total of 7,236,945 m3 of effluent for an average daily flow of 19,850 m3 per day, almost identical to 2017 values. The design capacity of the treatment plant is 30,660 m3 per day and based on the flows received for 2018, operated at 64.7% of the design capacity. This percentage decreased from 64.9% in 2017.

Overflow Events – During the 2018 year, the treatment plant had 8 overflow events (2017-7 events) where there was discharge from the wet weather equalization tank and discharge into the Avon River. These events were all due to flows caused by heavy precipitation and/or snow melt and a total of 704,398 m3 (2017 – 535,947 m3) was discharged.

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During a flow exceedance, the excess flow is diverted to an equalization tank and contact chamber where appropriate chlorination of the flow is achieved. Upon leaving the chlorine contact chamber, the flow is then de-chlorinated prior to discharge into the Avon River.

The treatment plant also experienced 2 bypass events. The first bypass event was due to equipment failure and resulted in 14,557 m3 bypassing the process sand filters. The second bypass event was to facilitate the removal of freshwater sponge accumulation in the UV channel and to apply growth-inhibiting coating to the channel walls. The bypass was pre- approved by the MECP and resulted in 128,520 m3 bypassing UV treatment. The quality of final effluent was not impacted by either bypass event as confirmed by sampling results.

Effluent Quality -The effluent discharges met all requirements for levels of removal for 2018:

  •  Carbonaceous Biological Demand 98.0 %
  •  Total Suspended Solids. 97.5 %
  •  Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen. 96.1 %
  •  Total Phosphorus. 95.4 %

Capital Projects – The following are some of the more major capital projects undertaken for the 2018 year.

  •  Aeration tank cleanout (tank 1)
  •  Motor replacements for sludge recirculation pumps
  • .Mud Well pump replacements
  •  Replacement of the Return Activated Sludge flowmeter
  • Automation of Primary Clarifier actuating valves
  •  Upgrade of the SCADA system (ongoing) In summary, the Water Pollution Control Plant, operated by OCWA, has met and exceeded all Environmental Compliance Approval requirements for the 2018 operating year. Financial Impact: Capital works and the cost of operating the Water Pollution Control Plant is financed through the Sanitary Sewer Surcharge rate.

    Staff Recommendation: THAT the 2018 Stratford Water Pollution Control Plant Annual Report be received for information.
    Mike Mortimer, Manager of Environmental Services
    Ed Dujlovic, Director of Infrastructure and Development Services
    Rob Horne, Chief Administrative Officer
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